REQUEST PRICE

Fields with * are required

Ametrine

Whether projecting from pegmatite walls or encrusting cavities in volcanic rock, quartz abounds worldwide. People have used quartz in jewellery for thousands of years. When quartz displays the colours of amethyst and citrine in a single gem, the material is called ametrine or amethyst-citrine. Ametrine’s only commercial source is the Anahi mine in Bolivia.
Legend has it that a Spanish conquistador discovered the location in the 1600s, but it was lost for more than three centuries. Ametrine began appearing on the market again during the 1970s. The mine, the Anahi, also produces natural amethyst and citrine.

Ametrine, one of the rarest types of transparent quartz, combines two colours: amethyst’s purple and citrine’s orange-to-yellow, growing together in a single crystal.

 Facts:

  • Mohs Hardness: 7
  • Mineral: Quartz
Whether projecting from pegmatite walls or encrusting cavities in volcanic rock, quartz abounds worldwide. People have used quartz in jewellery for thousands of years. When quartz displays the... read more »
Close window
Ametrine

Whether projecting from pegmatite walls or encrusting cavities in volcanic rock, quartz abounds worldwide. People have used quartz in jewellery for thousands of years. When quartz displays the colours of amethyst and citrine in a single gem, the material is called ametrine or amethyst-citrine. Ametrine’s only commercial source is the Anahi mine in Bolivia.
Legend has it that a Spanish conquistador discovered the location in the 1600s, but it was lost for more than three centuries. Ametrine began appearing on the market again during the 1970s. The mine, the Anahi, also produces natural amethyst and citrine.

Ametrine, one of the rarest types of transparent quartz, combines two colours: amethyst’s purple and citrine’s orange-to-yellow, growing together in a single crystal.

 Facts:

  • Mohs Hardness: 7
  • Mineral: Quartz
Top seller
Filter
Close filters
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
Viewed